Burial practices in Iron Age Britain
Read Online
Share

Burial practices in Iron Age Britain a discussion and gazetteer of the evidence, c.700 B.C.-A.D. 43 by Rowan Whimster

  • 458 Want to read
  • ·
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by B.A.R. in Oxford, England .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Great Britain,
  • Great Britain.

Subjects:

  • Iron age -- Great Britain.,
  • Tombs -- Great Britain.,
  • Funeral rites and ceremonies -- Great Britain.,
  • Britons.,
  • Great Britain -- Antiquities, Celtic.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementRowan Whimster.
SeriesBAR British series ;, 90-i, 90-ii, BAR British series ;, 90.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGN780.22.G7 W48 1981
The Physical Object
Pagination2 v. (457 p.) :
Number of Pages457
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3881970M
ISBN 100860541363
LC Control Number81209353

Download Burial practices in Iron Age Britain

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

accompanied addition adult appear Arras associated Associated objects barrows belong body bones Britain bronze brooches burials buried Burton Fleming cemetery central century B.C. cist close collection communities comparable confirmed contained context cremation crouched Culture deposits detailed discovery distinctive distribution ditch earlier early eastern enclosures England evidence . Book Reviews Burial Practices in Iron Age Britain. By R owan W himster. Richard Bradley. Page Published online: 22 Dec Download citation Death and Burial in Iron Age Britain, by D. W. Harding. Lindsey Büster. Archaeological Journal. Volume , - Issue : Richard Bradley. Get this from a library! Burial practices in Iron Age Britain: a discussion and gazetteer of the evidence, c B.C.-A.D. [Rowan Whimster]. In Death and Burial in Iron Age Britain, Harding examines the deposition of human and animal remains from the period - from whole skeletons to disarticulated fragments - and challenges the assumption that there should have been any regular form of cemetery in prehistory, arguing that the dead were more commonly integrated into settlements of the living than segregated into dedicated .

  In Death and Burial in Iron Age Britain, Harding examines the deposition of human and animal remains from the period - from whole skeletons to disarticulated fragments - and challenges the assumption that there should have been any regular form of cemetery in prehistory, arguing that the dead were more commonly integrated into settlements of the living than segregated into dedicated 5/5(1). By shining light through thin slices of bone, they were able to detect tiny differences not visible to the naked eye, and so distinguish different burial practices. The team studied 20 bones from two sites in Hampshire: Danebury, the most extensively excavated Iron Age hill fort in Britain, and Suddern Farm.   new evidence for iron age secondary burial practice and bone modification from gussage all saints and maiden castle (dorset, england). oxford journal of archaeology, vol. 27, issue. 3, p. Oxford Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 27, Issue. 3, p. Cited by: SECTION 9: IRON AGE BURIAL PRACTICES Burial ritual is less well defined in the Iron Age than in other periods of Irish prehistory although excavation in recent years has greatly increased the volume of known sites. Few formal burial sites are known from the transitional phase and it has been suggested that burial ritual took on a less formal.